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Tobermory

Translation: Maria's fountain (place name)

Region: Iceland


Tobermory? Ledaig?


In 1798, a whiskey distillery was built in the pretty little capital of the island of Mull. It was one of the first "official" distilleries ever and bore the name of the place: Tobermory. In the long run of time the distillery had to close again and again. She was shut down. Reopened. Decommissioned. Reopened. And she changed her name. In 1972 she resumed operation after a long closure under the name Ledaig (pronounced "Lä-dschick"). In 1979, also after closure, she started again as Tobermory. Today the distillery produces two malts with different names and different characters. The peaty Ledaig and the untidy Tobermory.


A little history


The Tobermory distillery is one of the oldest in Scotland and the only one on the island of Mull. The distillery was founded in 1798 by John Sinclair and was already closed in the 19th century over long periods.
From 1916 to 1930 Tobermory belonged to Distillers Company Ltd (DCL).
Between 1930 and 1972 the distillery was shut down. It was not re-opened until 1972 as the Ledaig Distillery. At first extended even to four stills, the joy lasted only briefly: The distillery went into bankruptcy in 1975 and had to close.
In 1978 Kirkleavington Property bought the Ledaig distillery and renamed it again to Tobermory.
From 1981 to 1989 Tobermory was closed again, from 1990 was produced again with limited capacity.
In 1993, Burn Stewart Distillers Ltd. bought. the distillery, which has been working continuously ever since. Let's hope it stays that way...


What do I actually have in the glass?


Depending on. The Ledaig is vigorously potholed, reminiscent of the cousins of Islay. The Tobermory is made from unmalted barley, so it lacks the superficial smokiness. However, since the water of the distillery flows through peat grounds, you will find not only the flowery, spicy notes but also a hint of peat in Tobermory.


3 reasons to love Tobermory


1) Because the Ledaig is so wonderfully smoky.
2) Because Tobermory is not.
3) Because the distillery can do both.


The one drama for the lonely island


The 15-year-old Tobermory from the Oloroso sherry keg is a stunner - and was awarded the prize for the best malt in his age group.

numbers and facts


Address: Tobermory, Isle of Mull, PA75 6NR
Founded: 1798 by John Sinclair
Status: active
Owner: Burn Stewart Distillers Ltd
Capacity: about 1,000,000 liters
2 wash stills (18,000 l)
2 spirit stills (16,000 l)
Water: Mishnish hole
Visitor Center: Yes
Telephone: +44 (0) 1688/302645
Website: www.burnstewartdistillers.com

Translation: Maria's fountain (place name) Region: Iceland Tobermory? Ledaig? In 1798, a whiskey distillery was built in the pretty little capital of the island of Mull. It was one... read more »
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Tobermory

Translation: Maria's fountain (place name)

Region: Iceland


Tobermory? Ledaig?


In 1798, a whiskey distillery was built in the pretty little capital of the island of Mull. It was one of the first "official" distilleries ever and bore the name of the place: Tobermory. In the long run of time the distillery had to close again and again. She was shut down. Reopened. Decommissioned. Reopened. And she changed her name. In 1972 she resumed operation after a long closure under the name Ledaig (pronounced "Lä-dschick"). In 1979, also after closure, she started again as Tobermory. Today the distillery produces two malts with different names and different characters. The peaty Ledaig and the untidy Tobermory.


A little history


The Tobermory distillery is one of the oldest in Scotland and the only one on the island of Mull. The distillery was founded in 1798 by John Sinclair and was already closed in the 19th century over long periods.
From 1916 to 1930 Tobermory belonged to Distillers Company Ltd (DCL).
Between 1930 and 1972 the distillery was shut down. It was not re-opened until 1972 as the Ledaig Distillery. At first extended even to four stills, the joy lasted only briefly: The distillery went into bankruptcy in 1975 and had to close.
In 1978 Kirkleavington Property bought the Ledaig distillery and renamed it again to Tobermory.
From 1981 to 1989 Tobermory was closed again, from 1990 was produced again with limited capacity.
In 1993, Burn Stewart Distillers Ltd. bought. the distillery, which has been working continuously ever since. Let's hope it stays that way...


What do I actually have in the glass?


Depending on. The Ledaig is vigorously potholed, reminiscent of the cousins of Islay. The Tobermory is made from unmalted barley, so it lacks the superficial smokiness. However, since the water of the distillery flows through peat grounds, you will find not only the flowery, spicy notes but also a hint of peat in Tobermory.


3 reasons to love Tobermory


1) Because the Ledaig is so wonderfully smoky.
2) Because Tobermory is not.
3) Because the distillery can do both.


The one drama for the lonely island


The 15-year-old Tobermory from the Oloroso sherry keg is a stunner - and was awarded the prize for the best malt in his age group.

numbers and facts


Address: Tobermory, Isle of Mull, PA75 6NR
Founded: 1798 by John Sinclair
Status: active
Owner: Burn Stewart Distillers Ltd
Capacity: about 1,000,000 liters
2 wash stills (18,000 l)
2 spirit stills (16,000 l)
Water: Mishnish hole
Visitor Center: Yes
Telephone: +44 (0) 1688/302645
Website: www.burnstewartdistillers.com

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