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Brora

Translation: River bridge
Region: (Northern) Highlands


Why Brora was not always Brora.

Until 1968, the distillery Clynelish was founded in 1819. Brora was just the name of the place where she stood. Then, however, the owners set up a second distillery directly opposite. They called her - also "Clynelish". The old, original Clynelish distillery was renamed "Brora". Under this name, she continued to produce her powerful, smoky whiskey until it was closed in 1983. The facilities and buildings are still not demolished. But a revival is more than unlikely. Too bad.


A little history

The distillery was built in 1819 as Clynelish by George Granville Levison-Gower, the second Marquis of Stafford and later Duke of Sutherland. With the construction of its own distillery, the Marquis wanted to take the numerous black-burners the basis of their "business" and move them to resettle.
The first decades of the distillery were characterized by numerous changes of tenants. Under George Lawson came from 1846 for the first time continuity in the management of the distillery.
In 1896 the distillery was then sold to James Ainslie and John Risk, who already owned the Banker Distillery in Banknock. In 1925, the Distillers Company Ltd. acquired. (DCL) the distillery, which belonged so from 1930 to the Scottish Malt Distillers. Between 1931 and 1939 Clynelish / Brora was closed.
In 1968, the new, second Clynelish distillery went into operation. For further story from there: see above ...


What do I actually have in the glass?

Very big taste cinema! Brora is one of the big names among malt lovers and makes her eyes shine like Ardbeg or Sprinbank. Full, complex, smoky, delicately sweet, lush and yet not superficial in spite of all its power.


3 reasons to love Brora

1) Because you only have to try it once.
2) Because you only have to try it once.
3) Because you only have to try it once.


The one drama for the lonely island

Every Brora that can still be found today is a revelation to Maltese friends. Special popularity was, as long as still available, the 1982 from the Rare Malts Selection.


numbers and facts

Address: Brora, Sutherland KW9 6LR
Founded: 1819 by the Marquis of Stafford, 1st Duke of Sutherland
Status: closed (since 1983)
Owner: Diageo
Capacity: formerly about 1,000,000 liters
1 wash still
1 spirit still
Water: formerly Clynemilton Burn
Visitor Center: -
Telephone: -
Website: -

Translation: River bridge Region: (Northern) Highlands Why Brora was not always Brora. Until 1968, the distillery Clynelish was founded in 1819. Brora was just the name of the place... read more »
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Brora

Translation: River bridge
Region: (Northern) Highlands


Why Brora was not always Brora.

Until 1968, the distillery Clynelish was founded in 1819. Brora was just the name of the place where she stood. Then, however, the owners set up a second distillery directly opposite. They called her - also "Clynelish". The old, original Clynelish distillery was renamed "Brora". Under this name, she continued to produce her powerful, smoky whiskey until it was closed in 1983. The facilities and buildings are still not demolished. But a revival is more than unlikely. Too bad.


A little history

The distillery was built in 1819 as Clynelish by George Granville Levison-Gower, the second Marquis of Stafford and later Duke of Sutherland. With the construction of its own distillery, the Marquis wanted to take the numerous black-burners the basis of their "business" and move them to resettle.
The first decades of the distillery were characterized by numerous changes of tenants. Under George Lawson came from 1846 for the first time continuity in the management of the distillery.
In 1896 the distillery was then sold to James Ainslie and John Risk, who already owned the Banker Distillery in Banknock. In 1925, the Distillers Company Ltd. acquired. (DCL) the distillery, which belonged so from 1930 to the Scottish Malt Distillers. Between 1931 and 1939 Clynelish / Brora was closed.
In 1968, the new, second Clynelish distillery went into operation. For further story from there: see above ...


What do I actually have in the glass?

Very big taste cinema! Brora is one of the big names among malt lovers and makes her eyes shine like Ardbeg or Sprinbank. Full, complex, smoky, delicately sweet, lush and yet not superficial in spite of all its power.


3 reasons to love Brora

1) Because you only have to try it once.
2) Because you only have to try it once.
3) Because you only have to try it once.


The one drama for the lonely island

Every Brora that can still be found today is a revelation to Maltese friends. Special popularity was, as long as still available, the 1982 from the Rare Malts Selection.


numbers and facts

Address: Brora, Sutherland KW9 6LR
Founded: 1819 by the Marquis of Stafford, 1st Duke of Sutherland
Status: closed (since 1983)
Owner: Diageo
Capacity: formerly about 1,000,000 liters
1 wash still
1 spirit still
Water: formerly Clynemilton Burn
Visitor Center: -
Telephone: -
Website: -

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